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Today is September 22nd, 2014. The current time is 4:11 AM.

Posted on September 1st, 2014 at 12:16 PM by Newark Ohio Garden Club

Date:                  September 12, 2014-Noon

Location:          Licking County Public Library-101 West Main St.    Newark

Program:           “Shrubs and Small Trees for the Home Landscape” by Michelle Thomas

Roll Call:             Name your favorite gardening book.

 

 

Posted on September 1st, 2014 at 11:35 AM by Newark Ohio Garden Club

October is the time to plant bulbs for spring beauty and color.  Daffodils are a favorite of many Central Ohio gardeners because they are so versatile and hearty.  Daffodils naturalize year to year. Deer will not eat the daffodil plants or flowers and,  squirrels, chipmunks and rabbits will generally not dig, move, or chew daffodil bulbs.

Selecting bulbs

When selecting daffodil or other bulbs, pick only dry hard bulbs. Always try to pick the largest bulbs- the larger the bulb, the larger the flower.

Selecting a planting site

1. Good drainage is critical -a slight slope helps drainage

2. Plant where bulbs will have some sun. Ideally, select a site with at least half a day of sun.   Planting under a tree should work because daffodils bloom before foliage appears.

Preparing the soil

Lewis Turner in his publication Let’s Grow Daffodils, says, “Many people make the mistake of planting a $50 plant in a 25 cent hole.”  Good preparation improves drainage.  Lift soil the depth of a shovel  to break up large lumps of soil -especially if clay based.  OSU Extension recommends amending heavy clay soil by adding amounts of 1/3 to –  1/2 sand, compost, peat or aged bark.

Planting bulbs

Plant about 4 times the height of the bulb–6-8 inches for daffodils.

Plant daffodils in groups of 3 ,5 or 7.

Water bulbs after planting.

References

Lewis P. Turner’s,  Let’s Grow Daffodils A handbook on Daffodil Culture-1994,  Turner’s Patch, P.O. Box 697, Walkersville , MD 21793

Ohio line.os.edu/hyperfact sheet 1000/1237,html

For more information

www. our ohio.org>hardy bulbs in Ohio fact sheet  HYG -1237-98


Posted on August 1st, 2014 at 11:30 AM by Newark Ohio Garden Club

Date:  August 8,2014

Location:  Home of Lina Robinson

9601 Fallsburg Road , Newark, Ohio

Program:  Exploring the Beehive with Lina Robinson

Carpools will leave Ollie’s Parking Lot at 11:30 am sharp

Posted on June 11th, 2014 at 3:44 PM by Newark Ohio Garden Club
With no notable insect or disease problems, reliable Wigela florida is a 4- to 5-foot shrub that is pretty alone or in a hedge. Its showy pink flowers in spring attract hummingbirds; fall foliage is colorful. Weigela prefers full sun, but tolerates shade as well as clay soil. One to try: award-winning 'Alexandra' (also marketed as 'Wine and Roses'). Zones 4-8

With no notable insect or disease problems, reliable Wigela florida is a 4- to 5-foot shrub that is pretty alone or in a hedge. Its showy pink flowers in spring attract hummingbirds; fall foliage is colorful. Weigela prefers full sun, but tolerates shade as well as clay soil. One to try: award-winning ‘Alexandra’ (also marketed as ‘Wine and Roses’). Zones 4-8

Posted on June 10th, 2014 at 3:42 PM by Newark Ohio Garden Club
Giant saucerlike flowers on 5-foot plants make this one of the most dramatic perennials in the garden. Easily grown in wet or dry soil, these showy flowers attract butterflies, not deer. Individual blooms are short-lived, but plants bloom prolifically until frost. Zones 4-9.

Giant saucerlike flowers on 5-foot plants make this one of the most dramatic perennials in the garden. Easily grown in wet or dry soil, these showy flowers attract butterflies, not deer. Individual blooms are short-lived, but plants bloom prolifically until frost. Zones 4-9.

Posted on June 9th, 2014 at 3:39 PM by Newark Ohio Garden Club
Native to dry upland prairies, fragrant Aster oblongifolius prospers in dry, clay or rocky soil. Covered with flowers in fall, it makes a strong companion plant to little bluestem grass and goldenrod. Pinch in early summer to prevent flopping. Choice variety is ‘October Skies’. Zones 3-8.

Native to dry upland prairies, fragrant Aster oblongifolius prospers in dry, clay or rocky soil. Covered with flowers in fall, it makes a strong companion plant to little bluestem grass and goldenrod. Pinch in early summer to prevent flopping. Choice variety is ‘October Skies’. Zones 3-8.

Posted on June 7th, 2014 at 3:38 PM by Newark Ohio Garden Club
Tolerant of heat and drought, this fragrant shrublike plant attracts bees, but not rabbits or deer. Its cool blue flowers delight all summer, mixing well with red, orange and yellow plantings. Zones 4-9.

Tolerant of heat and drought, this fragrant shrublike plant attracts bees, but not rabbits or deer. Its cool blue flowers delight all summer, mixing well with red, orange and yellow plantings. Zones 4-9.

Posted on June 6th, 2014 at 3:34 PM by Newark Ohio Garden Club
Tolerant of heat and drought, this fragrant shrublike plant attracts bees, but not rabbits or deer. Its cool blue flowers delight all summer, mixing well with red, orange and yellow plantings. Zones 4-9.

Tolerant of heat and drought, this fragrant shrub-like plant attracts bees, but not rabbits or deer. Its cool blue flowers delight all summer, mixing well with red, orange and yellow plantings. Zones 4-9.

Posted on June 5th, 2014 at 3:34 PM by Newark Ohio Garden Club
Not to be confused with the woody bush called cinquefoil, this drought-tolerant subshrub cinquefoil makes a good groundcover that’s especially effective on slopes. Orange, yellow, pink or white flowers bloom from June through August. Red peeling bark offers winter interest. Zones 2-7.

Not to be confused with the woody bush called cinquefoil, this drought-tolerant subshrub cinquefoil makes a good groundcover that’s especially effective on slopes. Orange, yellow, pink or white flowers bloom from June through August. Red peeling bark offers winter interest. Zones 2-7.

Posted on June 4th, 2014 at 3:32 PM by Newark Ohio Garden Club
One of the longest bloomers if deadheaded, coreopsis adds yellow, pink or bicolor flowers to the garden. Top choices include coreopsis grandiflora (pictured) and the thread-leaf ‘Moonbeam’ that will bloom for months if sheared back after flowers fade. Not a favorite of deer. Zones 3-9.

One of the longest bloomers if deadheaded, coreopsis adds yellow, pink or bicolor flowers to the garden. Top choices include coreopsis grandiflora (pictured) and the thread-leaf ‘Moonbeam’ that will bloom for months if sheared back after flowers fade. Not a favorite of deer. Zones 3-9.